Services in primary and secondary schools (58)

  1. Assess, Plan, Do, Review

    The SEND Code of practice is specific about good practice once a potential SEND is identified, and the four types of action needed to put effective support in place through the 'graduated approach'. The four actions are: Assess: the Early Years / class teacher and SENCo should…
  2. Children with Complex Needs

    When a child has exceptional need for education, health and social care support that cannot be met from resources, assessments or interventions normally available on their education setting, they will need an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). Where a child’s health or care needs…
  3. Education, Health and Care Assessment

    The assessment of a child’s Education, Health and Care needs is a coordinated assessment that brings together all existing relevant information about a child. A ‘Keyworker’ from the SEN Team will be assigned to the family to support them through the assessment. The assessment process…
  4. Funding for children with SEND

    Funding for Islington Mainstream Schools Funding for all schools includes money that they should use to support children with additional needs Funding for SEND Pupils Funding for children and young people comes under three main headings (or 'elements')
  5. How is my child with SEND supported in school?

    Around 5,000 children and young people in Islington have identified Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and most of these are supported in their local mainstream school or Early Years setting. The majority of children and young people will have their needs met through additional…
  6. I'm worried my child has SEN

    It is important to identify children who do have special educational needs (SEN) as early as possible. This ensures they get the help they need to learn and develop to the best of their ability. If your child has SEN, they may need extra help…
  7. Measuring progress for children with SEND

    The progress of all groups of children has been a prominent issue for all schools since the introduction of the 2012 Ofsted inspection framework. Parents also want to see evidence of progress. The issue of showing progress is particularly challenging for children with special educational…
  8. Measuring Success

    All children progress at different rates, and the same is true for children with SEND. Children and their needs are individual, and what is appropriate progress is therefore also individual, and has to be defined by success in meeting appropriately challenging SMART goals. The Council…
  9. Person Centred Planning

    Person Centred Planning discovers and acts on what is important to a person. It is a process for continual listening and learning, focussing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in alliance with their family and their…
  10. Preparing for adulthood EHC Plan reviews

    All EHC Reviews taking place from Year 9 and onwards must include a focus on preparing for adulthood, including employment, independent living and participation in society. This transition planning must be built into the EHC plan and where relevant should include effective planning for young…
  11. Role and Responsibilities of all Teachers

    The Council recognises has an expectation of participation, fulfilment and success for all our children. Planning for progression and differentiation are fundamental to successful teaching and learning. High expectations of progress must apply to all children working above, at, or below age-related expectations, including those who have SEND.…
  12. The Role of Governors

    Duties of Governing Bodies for SEN Governing Bodies have statutory responsibilities for pupils with SEND – they are set out in primary and secondary legislation The governing body must do its best to ensure that the school makes the necessary provision for every pupil with SEND…
  13. The Role Teaching Assistants (TAs)

    'Deployment and Impact of Support Staff' by the Institute of Education (2009) reported on a five year study of 8,200 children.  The study found that children who received the most support from TAs consistently made less progress than similar children who received less TA support.  'There has been…
  14. School Attendance and SEND

    Despite progress in recent years, both primary and secondary phases in Islington currently perform poorly in terms of school attendance in comparison with statistical neighbours. Children with SEND have higher patterns of non‐attendance; our aim is at least 96% attendance for all children. In 2016‐17,…
  15. School SEND Information Report

    The SEN Code of Practice says that Governing Bodies must publish information on their websites about the implementation of their SEND policy. The information published must be updated annually, with any in-year changes updated as soon as possible.
  16. SEN Support in Islington - Behaviour Handbook

    The Behaviour Handbook for Islington schools outlines approaches and interventions which encourage and allow inclusion and reduce the risk of exclusion. Within the universal offer, which underpins the layers of support and intervention, is an understanding and ethos which supports the ideals of inclusion. It…
  17. Special School Admission Information

    Most children and young people with SEN are educated in mainstream schools. Each mainstream school in Islington is supported by the Outreach teams linked to the local special schools. Their role is to build the skills, knowledge and capacity of mainstream schools to make sure…
  18. Supporting Children with SEN in Schools

    Children usually start school in the September after their 4th birthday, and will stay in education until they are at least 18 years old. Throughout their school years teachers will plan their lessons to make sure that all children can learn at their own pace.…
  19. Supporting pupils with medical conditions

    The Children and Families Act 2014 (Section 100) placed a new statutory requirement on schools to make arrangements for supporting children with medical conditions, supported by related guidance Supporting Pupils at School with Medical Conditions.  
  20. Team Around the Child

    A Team Around the Child (TAC) is a multi-disciplinary team of practitioners established on a case-by-case basis to support a child, young person or family. TACs support good professional practice in joined-up working, information sharing and early intervention. The model involves: A joined-up assessment, usually…
  21. Thinking about school

    Young children develop and change very quickly. Many children who have additional needs in the early years will make good progress and will not need more support when they start primary school. Some with additional needs may need further support when they start school.  Schools…
  22. What are Special Educational Needs?

    From the moment they are born children are developing and learning new skills. They do so at different speeds, and learn in different ways. Some may be slow starters but will usually catch up with other children. Children have ‘Special Educational Needs’ (SEN) if they…
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