Services in SEN Support Services (17)

  1. Children with Complex Needs

    When a child has exceptional need for education, health and social care support that cannot be met from resources, assessments or interventions normally available on their education setting, they will need an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). Where a child’s health or care needs…
  2. Disagreement Resolution

    Any disagreement regarding special educational needs assessment or provision should try to be resolved through disagreement resolution. This could be between parents/young people with schools, colleges or the Local Authority. The Local Authority must make disagreement resolution services available to parents and young people. Disagreement…
  3. Education, Health and Care Assessment

    The assessment of a child’s Education, Health and Care needs is a coordinated assessment that brings together all existing relevant information about a child. A ‘Keyworker’ from the SEN Team will be assigned to the family to support them through the assessment. The assessment process…
  4. English as an Additional Language (EAL) and SEND

    ‘Difficulties related solely to learning English as an additional language are not SEN’ SEND Code of Practice Although some children with English as an Additional Language (EAL) will also have SEND, the great majority will not. Data shows that pupils with EAL often make rapid…
  5. Exclusions - Information for parents

    The decision to exclude a pupil is a very serious matter and should only be used as a last resort. Only the head teacher can exclude once they have carried out a thorough investigation. Find further information on types of exclusion, what happens next if…
  6. First Tier Tribunal (SEN and Disability)

    The Tribunal (part of the First-tier Tribunal [Health, Education and Social Care Chamber]) hears appeals against decisions made by Local Authorities in relation to children’s Education, Health and Care (EHC) assessments and plans. It also hears disability discrimination claims against schools.
  7. Funding for children with SEND

    Funding for Islington Mainstream Schools Funding for all schools includes money that they should use to support children with additional needs Funding for SEND Pupils Funding for children and young people comes under three main headings (or 'elements')
  8. I'm worried my child has SEN

    It is important to identify children who do have special educational needs (SEN) as early as possible. This ensures they get the help they need to learn and develop to the best of their ability. If your child has SEN, they may need extra help…
  9. Measuring progress for children with SEND

    The progress of all groups of children has been a prominent issue for all schools since the introduction of the 2012 Ofsted inspection framework. Parents also want to see evidence of progress. The issue of showing progress is particularly challenging for children with special educational…
  10. Measuring Success

    All children progress at different rates, and the same is true for children with SEND. Children and their needs are individual, and what is appropriate progress is therefore also individual, and has to be defined by success in meeting appropriately challenging SMART goals. The Council…
  11. Mediation

    Mediation must be available to any parent or young person who is not happy with the final version of their Education Health and Care Plan. (Any disagreement about anything else is open to disagreement resolution, not mediation). Level 1 – Mediation Advice Access to mediation…
  12. Person Centred Planning

    Person Centred Planning discovers and acts on what is important to a person. It is a process for continual listening and learning, focussing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in alliance with their family and their…
  13. Pupil Premium

    What is the Pupil Premium? The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 to raise the attainment of disadvantaged children and young people (i.e. those eligible for free school meals nationally). The national allocation to schools is £2.4 billion in 2017/18 (£15 million to Islington).…
  14. Role and Responsibilities of all Teachers

    The Council recognises has an expectation of participation, fulfilment and success for all our children. Planning for progression and differentiation are fundamental to successful teaching and learning. High expectations of progress must apply to all children working above, at, or below age-related expectations, including those who have SEND.…
  15. The Role of Governors

    Duties of Governing Bodies for SEN Governing Bodies have statutory responsibilities for pupils with SEND – they are set out in primary and secondary legislation The governing body must do its best to ensure that the school makes the necessary provision for every pupil with SEND…
  16. School Attendance and SEND

    Despite progress in recent years, both primary and secondary phases in Islington currently perform poorly in terms of school attendance in comparison with statistical neighbours. Children with SEND have higher patterns of non‐attendance; our aim is at least 96% attendance for all children. In 2016‐17,…
  17. SEND Outreach Services

    SEND Outreach Services are commissioned on behalf of Islington’s mainstream schools to an agreed service specification. Their role is to improved outcomes for all children and young people with SEND by helping schools to increase their capacity to meet a wider range of needs. The…
  18. Supporting Children with SEN in Schools

    Children usually start school in the September after their 4th birthday, and will stay in education until they are at least 18 years old. Throughout their school years teachers will plan their lessons to make sure that all children can learn at their own pace.…
  19. What are Special Educational Needs?

    From the moment they are born children are developing and learning new skills. They do so at different speeds, and learn in different ways. Some may be slow starters but will usually catch up with other children. Children have ‘Special Educational Needs’ (SEN) if they…
  20. What does an Educational Psychologist do?

    Educational Psychologists work with children and young people between the ages of 0 and 25 years who are residents of Islington or who attend Islington schools. They work in a range of educational settings including children’s centres, early years’ settings, mainstream primary and secondary schools,…
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